Lostwithiel
Lostwithiel

Lostwithiel comes from the Cornish "lostwydhyel" which means "tail of a wooded area"
Lostwithiel lies tucked away in the Fowey Valley, hidden by richly wooded hills, between the busy A390 and the upper tidal reaches of the river.
Once the County Capital, this small town has a character all of its own, proud of its heritage, independent, yet friendly and happy to share its many charms.
Now quiet and peaceful, Lostwithiel has become the antiques centre of the county. Its many antiques shops, fairs, markets and auctions draw people from far and wide.

Heligan Gardens

200 acres of garden history, mystery and romance
Heligan, seat of the Tremayne family for more than 400 years, is one of the most mysterious estates in England. At the end of the nineteenth century its thousand acres were at their zenith, but only a few years later bramble and ivy were already drawing a green veil over this "Sleeping Beauty". After decades of neglect, the devastating hurricane of 1990 should have consigned the Lost Gardens of Heligan to a footnote in history.

 

Minack Theatre

The Minack Theatre is an open-air theatre, constructed above a gully with a rocky granite outcrop jutting into the sea.
The theatre is at Porthcurno, 4 miles from Land's End in Cornwall, England.
The season runs each year from May to September, and by 2012 some 80,000 people a year see a show, and more than 100,000 pay an entrance fee to look around the site.

It has appeared in a listing of the world's most spectacular theatres!

Eden Project

Welcome to Eden's global garden
The Eden Project is an unforgettable experience in a breathtaking location; a global garden; a place of beauty and wonder. Our world famous architecture and art draws inspiration from nature, our educational work is about creating a positive future in a world that is going to go through radical change, and we try to ensure everyone who visits Eden leaves knowing something more about their connection to the world. That's the big stuff?Eden is also about simple pleasures; enjoying tasty food, rediscovering what puts the great into the great outdoors, imaginative play for children, taking time to stop and smell the flowers, having a good time.

Restormel Castle

The great 13th century circular shell-keep of Restormel still encloses the principal roomss of the castle in remarkably good condition. It stands on an earlier Norman mound surrounded by a deep dry ditch, atop a high spur beside the River Fowey. Twice visited by the Black Prince, it finally saw action during the Civil War in 1644. It commands fantastic views and is a favourite picnic spot.
English Heritage exists to make sure the best of the past is kept to enrich our lives today and in the future.

Lanhydrock House

A Magnificent National Trust late Victorian country house with extensive servants' quarters, gardens and wooded estate.
Stunning 17th-century gatehouse and long gallery
The ultimate 19th-century 'Upstairs/Downstairs' experience
Fabulous collection of spring-flowering magnolias and bluebell woods
Adventure playground, with wobbly bridge, scramble nets and animal sculptures
Successful dormouse monitoring programme
Film location for The Three Musketeers (1993) and Twelfth Night (1996)